By Kim Krieger
USA.- Two potent antibacterials found in fish do their dirty work in unexpected ways, report UConn chemists and colleagues in a paper accepted by the FEBS Journal. The research could point the way to entirely new classes of antibiotics.

The Rectorate and Conference center of the University of Zaragoza hosted Spain’s 14th Aquaculture National Congress, from 3 to 5 October 2017. Around 300 aquaculture experts came together under the heading “Our aquaculture, a safe bet” to discuss feeding and nutrition, breeding and genetics, pathology, health and welfare, aquariology, food quality and consumption, environment and spatial planning, production and technology or business innovations.

Washington, DC, USA.- Today, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) published the Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report. This summary report shares the results of stakeholder discussions held on May 23–24, 2017, regarding challenges and opportunities for cross-sector, public-private partnerships to utilize carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for producing algal biomass.

Norway.- Some of the recommendations on vitamin and mineral supplements in the feed for Atlantic salmon must be changed. This happens because a shift from mainly marine ingredients to feeds where more than 70% comes from plants has changed the requirements. Implementation of this new knowledge is important for the growth and welfare of the salmon.

USA.- For over a decade, companies have promised a future of renewable fuel from algae. Investors interested in moving the world away from fossil fuel have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the effort, and with good reason. Algae replicate quickly, requiring little more than water and sunlight to accumulate to massive amounts, which then convert atmospheric CO2 into lipids (oils) that can be harvested and readily processed into biodiesel.

Germany.- Sunlight allows green algae to do more than just carry out photosynthesis. Some unicellular algae actually use light to switch the adhesion of their flagella to surfaces on and off – a phenomenon first discovered by physicists at the Göttingen Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization. These findings are particularly relevant to the development of bioreactors in which algae serve as a renewable raw material for producing biofuels.