Bergen, Norway.- So far, fish have been spared the problem of mycotoxins produced by mould, but the increase of plant ingredients in farmed fish feed has resulted in more such toxins in fish feed too. Many ‘new’ toxins have been discovered, and we know little about any consequences they may have for fish and people.

Barcelona, Spain.- Surprisingly, low concentration of toxic chemical products in rivers –from fungicides to antidepressants- can change the swimming and feeding behaviours in some creatures, according to a new research study led by experts from the University of Barcelona and the University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom). Also, the effects can be unexpected depending on the kind of toxin mix, according to this study published in the journal Environmental Pollution.

By Kim Krieger
USA.- Two potent antibacterials found in fish do their dirty work in unexpected ways, report UConn chemists and colleagues in a paper accepted by the FEBS Journal. The research could point the way to entirely new classes of antibiotics.

The Rectorate and Conference center of the University of Zaragoza hosted Spain’s 14th Aquaculture National Congress, from 3 to 5 October 2017. Around 300 aquaculture experts came together under the heading “Our aquaculture, a safe bet” to discuss feeding and nutrition, breeding and genetics, pathology, health and welfare, aquariology, food quality and consumption, environment and spatial planning, production and technology or business innovations.

Norway.- Some of the recommendations on vitamin and mineral supplements in the feed for Atlantic salmon must be changed. This happens because a shift from mainly marine ingredients to feeds where more than 70% comes from plants has changed the requirements. Implementation of this new knowledge is important for the growth and welfare of the salmon.

China.- A new high-definition genome sequence of the sea cucumber provides molecular insights into its ability to regenerate, according to a new study publishing 12 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Xiaojun Zhang, Lina Sun, Hongsheng Yang and Jianhai Xiang, of the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and colleagues. The genome sequence also helps explain why the sea cucumber has such a radically different skeletal structure from other members of the echinoderm phylum, and may be useful for understanding evolution of the animal kingdom.